Loading…
This event has ended. Create your own event on Sched.
Welcome to the fifth annual celebration of Climate Action Day!  We are excited about what’s in store for us this year and we are grateful for your engagement with the day.

All students are required to register for and attend Climate Action Day on Friday, April 26. You must register for the Opening Assembly Keynote Address AND either one (1) all day workshop OR two (2) short workshops: one Featured and one Student Choice.


Log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Friday, April 26
 

8:45am EDT

Keynote Address: "Every Choice Matters"
Limited Capacity filling up

Location:  Assembly Hall
Required Opening Assembly, Keynote Address
Ko Barrett, Vice-Chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), will speak on major developments in climate from the past year, including the IPCC’s Special Report on 1.5 degrees Celsius of Global Warming. She’ll explain what these developments tell us about climate science and policy, and how to be part of the solution.

Speakers
KB

Ko Barrett

Ko Barrett currently serves as one of three vice chairs of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the international body created to review and assess the scientific, technical, and socio-economic information produced worldwide that is relevant to understanding climate change... Read More →


Friday April 26, 2019 8:45am - 10:00am EDT
Assembly Hall

10:00am EDT

Oyster Reef Restoration at UNH Jackson Estuarine Laboratory
Limited Capacity full

Location:  Meet in the EPAC Commons
Vehicle: A 10 Passenger Van

We will work with Dr. Raymond Grizzle at UNH’s Jackson Estuarine Laboratory on Great Bay to help with efforts to restore the population of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica. As filter feeders, oysters play a key role in the ecology of Great Bay estuary keeping the water clear and clean and making it inhabitable to other species. However, the oyster population has declined over 90% due to impacts from pollution, disease, and over-harvest. As the oysters decline so do the eelgrass beds and the fish who use the bay as a nursery. Rising water temperatures caused by climate change are changing the ecology of the area and making the challenges of oyster re-establishment even greater. The University of New Hampshire and the Nature Conservancy are together working with fishermen, waterfront landowners, restaurants, and volunteers like you to build up the oyster reefs. These efforts are paying off and the acres of oyster reef are added each year. Come learn about the effort and be a part of gearing up for the 2019 growing season.

Wear clothing you don't mind getting dirty.
Long pants, long shirts, sturdy shoes, cold weather or rain gear.
 Bring a filled water bottle.

Speakers
RG

Ray Grizzle

University of New Hampshire's Jackson Estuarine Laboratory


Friday April 26, 2019 10:00am - 12:45pm EDT
EPAC Commons for Transportation

10:29am EDT

Climate Change and Great Bay Habitats - Hike, Work, and Learn at Lubberland Creek Preserve, Newmarket:
Limited Capacity full

Location:  Parking Lot behind St. Anthony's Bakery
Transportation: Yellow School Bus

The Volunteer Event is being sponsored by TNC on the Lubberland Creek Preserve in Newmarket, NH. The event includes 3 stations focused on estuary education and invasive plant removal. Students will be broken into 3 groups and rotate between the three stations.
Station 1 will be an educational hike on the trails at Lubberland Creek which will showcase the habitats and species that exist in the Great Bay watershed and describe the land conservation story and tools that were used to protect the land that was at one time considered for the siting of the largest oil refinery in the US.
Station 2 will be located at the trail terminus on the shore of Great Bay. Here, we will discuss our oyster Citizen Science activities at TNC, and teach participants how to use the Picture Post at this site to help us monitoring changes over time to the salt marsh.
Station 3 will include a hands-on work activity to help us locate and pull the non-native garlic mustard plants from our Preserve from the wooded and shrubby areas near the trailhead.

We will be walking on hiking trails for the educational hike with some minor topography. The garlic mustard site is off-trail, brushy, flat and easy to get to from the parking area.

Participants should wear sturdy boots and dress appropriately for the weather. Long sleeves and pants are encouraged to protect against bugs and thorny vegetation.

Participants should bring a re-fillable water bottle.

Water, work gloves, tools and instructions will be provided. A picnic lunch will be provided.


Speakers
JG

Joanne Glode

The Nature Conservancy


Friday April 26, 2019 10:29am - 3:00pm EDT
Parking Lot behind St. Anthony's Bakery for Transportation

10:29am EDT

Dune Grass Planting with SeaGrant
Limited Capacity full

Location:  Parking Lot behind St. Anthony's Bakery
Vehicle: Yellow School Bus

Coastal storms seem to be increasing and our limited sand dunes along the NH coast are eroding. These dunes form a critical habitat for many species and protect areas behind them from ocean storm surges and tides. Dune grass (Ammophila sp.) is a pioneer plant essential for stabilizing sand on these dunes. In this hands-on, double workshop spanning the morning, we will be planting dune grass on our local sand dunes with the hope of restoring and conserving them.

Bring a water bottle and dress in layers - the coast is always cool in April!

Please remember to wear boots, long pants, and light-colored clothing, and to use an insect spray such as Deep Woods Off to reduce the risk of a tick bite, as ticks in this area may carry Lyme Disease. After the workshop, please conduct a tick check on yourself.

Lunch will be provided.


Friday April 26, 2019 10:29am - 3:00pm EDT
Parking Lot behind St. Anthony's Bakery for Transportation

10:29am EDT

Ecoacoustics and Climate Change
Limited Capacity full

Location:  EPAC Commons
Vehicle: Dragon

Climate change can induce unexpected alterations to biological communities as shifts in environmental conditions destabilize established ecological niches, symbiotic relationships and phenological patterns. One way to measure these changes is to monitor acoustic communities, called passive acoustic monitoring (PAM). Acoustic communities consist of the animals that produce sound, including mostly mammals, birds, amphibians and insects, and monitoring the soundscape signature produced by these soniferous species can provide insights into structural community changes related to seasonality, response to disturbance or restoration, and those associated with climate impacts. Students that attend the Climate Action Day activities hosted by the UNH Integrative Animal Behavior and Ecoacoustics Laboratory will visit the IABE lab, meet faculty and students conducting research related to human impacts on acoustic communities, and walk to a local campus green space to visit acoustic monitoring stations and collect data that will be examined back in the IABE lab.

Dress for the weather, bring a water bottle, and wear sturdy shoes.  Lunch will be provided.

Speakers
DD

Dr. Daniel Howard

University of New Hampshire, Integrative Animal Behavior and Ecoacoustics Laboratory
DC

Dr. Carrie Hall

University of New Hampshire, Integrative Animal Behavior and Ecoacoustics Laboratory


Friday April 26, 2019 10:29am - 3:00pm EDT
EPAC Commons for Transportation

10:29am EDT

Habitat Restoration at Milne Nature Sanctuary
Limited Capacity full

Location:  EPAC Commons
Vehicle: Van #2 (Ten (10) Passenger Van)

Students will join Ellen Snyder, Durham’s Land Stewardship Coordinator, to discuss and assess the health of the Mill Pond, the fate of the Mill Pond Dam, and the health of the tidal Oyster River and salt marsh below the dam. After a picnic lunch on the shores of Mill Pond, we will walk a short distance to Durham’s one-acre Milne Nature Sanctuary, where the Town is removing invasive plants and restoring the native plant community. Students will assist in pulling invasive plant seedlings and saplings, remove brush from along the river, restore a stone wall, and spread mulch along walking paths. This effort will help the Town in its goal to restore ecological health to the site and provide the public a more inviting place within walking distance of UNH and downtown Durham. We will wrap up with 5 minutes of quiet contemplation and assess how stewardship here and around Mill Pond helps with climate change resilience.

Wear clothing you don't mind getting dirty. Long pants, long shirts, sturdy shoes, cold weather or rain gear. Bring a filled water bottle.

 Ms. Snyder will provide: work gloves, tools, snacks, and extra water.  Lunch will be provided.

Speakers
ES

Ellen Snyder

Land Stewardship Coordinator, Town of Durham, NH


Friday April 26, 2019 10:29am - 3:00pm EDT
EPAC Commons for Transportation

10:29am EDT

Habitat Restoration at the Kimball Reserve
Limited Capacity filling up

Location: EPAC Commons
Vehicle: Dragon

This hands-on workshop takes place at the Kimball Reserve on Pickpocket Road in Exeter. This reserve, owned by the Southeast Land Trust, once grew the Victory Gardens that were so important to our nation during WWII. Where this garden once stood young white pine are growing. Students will work with staff from Southeast Land Trust to remove invasive plants that are taking hold in the understory of the forest.

Come prepared to work hard and get your hands dirty. Dress accordingly (long pants, long shirts, sturdy shoes, and possibly rain clothes). Bring a water bottle.

Lunch will be provided.

Here’s a link to a map of the parcel http://seltnh.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Kimball-MAP-ONLY_UPDATED.pdf


Speakers
PA

Phil Auger

Southeast Land Trust


Friday April 26, 2019 10:29am - 3:00pm EDT
EPAC Commons for Transportation

10:29am EDT

Planting for Climate Change Resilience at Odiorne State Park
Limited Capacity full

Location: EPAC Commons
Vehicle: Dragon

New Hampshire’s coastline is a mix of rocky shores, beaches, mud flats, and salt marshes. Rocky shores are the dominant feature of Odiorne State Park but small patches of the other habitats can be found there as well. We will learn how rising sea levels and higher energy storms are predicted to impact these habitats. Then, we will plant dunes grasses and other native species to help build and stabilize the shore.

Wear clothing you don't mind getting dirty. Long pants, long shirts, sturdy shoes, cold weather or rain gear. Bring a filled water bottle.

Lunch will be provided.

Speakers
AS

Arianne Spear

Rockingham County Conservation District


Friday April 26, 2019 10:29am - 3:00pm EDT
EPAC Commons for Transportation

10:29am EDT

Tree Planting Day at Tuckaway Farm
Limited Capacity full

Location: Parking Lot behind St. Anthony's Bakery
Vehicle: Yellow School Bus

Plant trees, help wildlife! We will be planting tree seedlings to provide important wildlife habitat, and to learn about the usefulness of fast-growing trees for producing fuel and other products. First we'll go on a walk to learn about early successional wildlife habitat and the animal species that depend on it, and learn some plant identification. Then, we will plant!

Wear clothing that is appropriate for the weather and you don't mind getting dirty in, including long pants to protect against ticks and poison ivy (we'll do our best to avoid them but you can't be too careful!).

Bring a filled water bottle, sunscreen, and anything else you feel you need to be comfortable outside for 3 hours. We will provide tools, gloves, and bug spray.

Lunch will be provided.

Speakers
AW

Alena Warren

Strafford County Conservation District


Friday April 26, 2019 10:29am - 3:00pm EDT
Parking Lot behind St. Anthony's Bakery for Transportation

10:30am EDT

Air pollution: A Grand Challenge for Human Health and Environmental Justice
Limited Capacity filling up

Venue: Assembly Hall

Air pollution is the single most important environmental health risk factor, killing millions of people every year worldwide. But what are the main pollutants to be concerned about, and how do they hurt us? What are the main sources of pollution, and how can we reduce it? Do people breathe the same air across the world, or even across the United States?

This workshop will be a primer on air pollution: sources, effects and controls, and the grand challenge air pollution poses for all of us in the 21st Century. This is a big, exciting, and important problem, affecting human health and environmental justice. In fact, as our recent work has shown, in the United States a major class of pollutants is disproportionately inhaled by black and Hispanic Americans, even though it is disproportionately caused by the white/other racial-ethnic majority. The solutions to air pollution will depend on involvement from those in the physical, social, environmental and health sciences, not to mention engineers, lawyers, policy makers, businesses, and activists. Expect to leave with some surprising facts from the emerging scientific literature about air pollution; some understanding about what laws are in place for cleaning the air in the United States; and some actionable knowledge about how to find out about air quality in your area.




Speakers

Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Assembly Hall

10:30am EDT

The Secret Lives of Icelandic Glaciers
Limited Capacity filling up

Venue:  Goel Center for Theater and Dance

Environmental educator and National Geographic expert Dr. M Jackson has spent years researching glaciers and climate change. In The Secret Lives of Icelandic Glaciers, she effectively explains what glaciers are, why they matter to people and landscape, and how understanding the individuality and interconnections of people and ice is critical to engaging with climate change today. She poses a stark question: what actually happens as communities lose their glaciers? By drawing on the glacier-related narratives, knowledges, and practices of people living along the southeastern coast of Iceland, Jackson demonstrates the lived complexities peoples worldwide face living within modern transforming environments. Jackson shares unforgettable stories of Icelandic glaciers that will dramatically change how people worldwide think about ice.


Speakers
avatar for Dr. M.  Jackson

Dr. M. Jackson

Geographer, Glaciolotist, TED Fellow, National Geographic Society Explorer
Dr. M Jackson is a geographer, glaciologist, TED Fellow, and National Geographic Society Explorer. M earned a doctorate from the University of Oregon where she examined how climate change transformed people and glacier communities in Iceland. M is the recipient of many grants and... Read More →


Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Goel Center for Theater and Dance

10:30am EDT

Beyond Straws: How Do We Move our Communities and Culture Away from Single-Use Plastic?
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Elting Room

Where is all the plastic coming from? What are the challenges in reducing it? How can we make exponential change? Take your next step for the environment--there’s never been a better time! Not only are we in a time of extraordinary need for environmental action, but the options and support for each of us to contribute have never been more abundant and accessible. Join Keith Tharp of Sustainable Seacoast to engage these exciting conversation!

Speakers
KT

Keith Tharp

Sustainable Seacoast


Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Elting Room

10:30am EDT

Campus Heating Plant Tour
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Patio steps of Goel Center for Theater and Dance

Did you ever wonder…
Is the Academy doing its part to cut its emissions of greenhouse gasses?

How could you make ice in the rinks with superheated steam?

And what’s under that smokestack behind the gymnasium?

Tour the Academy’s heating plant with manager Mr. Joe Klempa and learn about how the Academy boils and recycles thousands of gallons of water every day to heat and cool the spaces we live and work in, and how we use updated technologies to get these jobs done with environmental stewardship in mind.  Each participant will receive a “treasure hunt” puzzle to discover key facts and surprising stories of PEA’s energy use and production.


Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Patio steps of Goel Center for Theater and Dance

10:30am EDT

Campus Waste Audit
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Entrance to Facilities Management, directly across from the New Parking Garage entrance.  NOTE: This is a change in venue. Please dress accordingly.

Do you know how much waste PEA generates in a day? What is the largest component of this waste? What is put in the trash that can be reused or recycled? To find answers to these questions and more join the Climate Action Day Waste Audit Team! Using gloves and other protective gear, dive in and separate waste from various Academy buildings. Estimate the volume and/or percentage each type contributes to the daily total. How can we reduce this amount? The information you compile will be made available to the PEA Community along with any ideas on how to reduce our waste as individuals and as a school.


10:30am EDT

Creating Long-Term Value and Outperformance through Impact Investing, with PEA Alumnus Peter Grubstein
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Library Commons

Does achieving a double bottom line have to be concessionary? Which is, can you get a social return on your investment as well as a financial return? In this presentation you will learn about different ways to make an impact while generating an at-or-above market return. We expect that you will gain insight on the return profiles for various investment objectives along the impact investing spectrum, and learn about the strategies used to achieve those objectives. We will show you how the industry has evolved overtime, including common misnomers and misperceptions surrounding the space, as well as best practices, mistakes to avoid when investing in impact funds, and what the future looks like for impact.


Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Library Commons

10:30am EDT

Eating for the Climate: Experimenting with plant-Forward Diets
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Phillips Church Basement

If you are interested in reducing your climate footprint, but you aren’t sure how, this workshop is for you! Eating fewer animal products is a substantive and immediate action you can take for the health of the planet, but many people worry about their protein intake and their food option, when making a transition to eating less meat. The 3 presenters will share their own transitions and explorations with dietary choices, in order to support and encourage yours. Come ready to engage in discussion and to explore options for a healthier lifestyle! Vegan treats will be available to sample.

Speakers
ES

Emmett Shell '18

Emmett Shell ’18 is in his 6th year as a vegan. At Exeter, he balanced a vegan diet with varsity sport participation in basketball and volleyball.
HD

Heidi Dumont

Heidi Dumont is the force behind Wetherell Dining Hall’s fresh, delicious food.  She is not vegetarian or vegan, but she has attended several conferences and trainings to become the ally she currently is for plant-based dietary choices.
AS

Amy Schwartz

History teacher Amy Schwartz has been vegetarian since 2013 and recently transitioned to veganism. A self-professed meat lover, she has many strategies to share on transitioning your diet.


Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Phillips Church Basement

10:30am EDT

Exeter Conservation Commission Environmental Service
Limited Capacity full

Location:  EPAC Commons
Vehicle: Dragon

Learn more about your own backyard! Join the Exeter Conservation Commission in Exeter's Fort Rock Town Forest. Put in morning's work planting trees, maintaining trails or restoring wildlife habitat. Plan on getting dirty.

Wear long pants, a long-sleeve shirt and rugged footwear. Bring a water bottle. Gloves and bug spray provided.

Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
EPAC Commons for Transportation

10:30am EDT

In Business to Save Our Home Planet
Limited Capacity filling up

Venue:  Round Room, 2nd Floor of the Music Building

Stefan Bergill is a sales rep for the outdoor apparel company Patagonia. He will outline Patagonia’s strategies for both helping improve and reducing their impact on the environment. As a company, Patagonia is committed to designing sustainable products, following sustainable practices, and helping others do the same. Learn what strides Patagonia has made and what plans they have for the future. Mr. Bergill will help to explain the effects of the clothing industry on the environment and how one small clothing company can try to mitigate climate change.

Speakers
SB

Stefan Bergill

Patagonia, Inc.


Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Round Room, 2nd Floor of Music Building

10:30am EDT

In Plain Sight: Exeter
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Meyer Auditorium, Basement of Academy Building

What does it take to make Exeter work? As you walk around Exeter you are probably aware of the beauty of the place and the facilities but what are the environmental costs to maintain it? As you eat in the cafeteria you see the first step of food disposal but what is happening behind the scenes? Where do the power, heat, and water that the campus relies on come from? Power, heat, food, and waste disposal each are fundamental needs but are so ubiquitous they are practically invisible. Colorado-based landscape photographer Evan Anderman ‘83 will lead you on a photo shoot to see the invisible side of the Exeter campus so you can make others see their daily impact. This workshop will empower you to make visible the invisible environmental costs of running Phillips Exeter Academy and, as Edward Degas puts it, to make art that makes others see.

Speakers
EA

Evan Anderman '83

Evan Anderman is a social-landscape photographer based in his hometown of Denver, Colorado who seeks to challenge our understanding of the relationship between human development and the natural world.  His aerial photography endeavors to bring into focus the difficult to see widespread... Read More →


Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Meyer Auditorium, Basement of the Academy Building

10:30am EDT

It’s Electric! (Your city’s new public bus, that is.)
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Gillepsie room, located in the Institutional Advancement building

From New York to Seattle, some of the country’s most environmentally progressive transit agencies have committed to electrifying their entire public bus fleet over the next couple decades.  Why are electric buses an integral part of cities’ climate action plans, and can this new technology live up to its promise?  How will transit agencies afford this massive transformation and achieve it without disrupting service?  In this workshop, we’ll explore the opportunities and challenges of rolling out electric buses, whether in Exeter, NH or in large cities with millions of residents.  Put yourself in the shoes of a transit planner as we figure out how, when, and where to charge these new high-tech and whisper-quiet vehicles.  Our goals are to reduce emissions, stay on schedule, minimize costs, and get people home from work and school without running out of juice!

Speakers
KT

Kate Tomford '95

Senior Analyst, Chicago Transit Authority
Kate Tomford is a Senior Analyst in the Finance Department at the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA), where she manages energy-related initiatives including energy efficiency, electric buses, and utility cost management.  She has 15 years of experience in the field of environmental... Read More →


Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Gillepsie room, located in the Institutional Advancement building

10:30am EDT

Ocean Plastics and Hampton Beach Clean Up
Limited Capacity full

Location:  Meet in the Parking Lot behind St. Anthony's Bakery
Vehicle: Yellow School Bus

The Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation, a non-profit based in Portsmouth, NH, will be leading students in a hands-on beach cleanup at Hampton Beach. After a presentation and discussion about ocean plastics, we will be removing marine debris such as bottles, ropes, bags, and cigarette butts, while collecting data on the types and amounts of debris found as part of Blue Ocean Society’s research program. Students will work in groups to clean from the water’s edge up to the sidewalk near the beach’s landmark outdoor stage, collecting any and all trash they can find, from the tiniest fragments to the largest objects.

Dress for the weather. It will be colder at the beach than on campus.
Gloves and collection bags provided. 

Speakers
KP

Katie Pelon

Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation


Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Parking Lot behind St. Anthony's Bakery for Transportation

10:30am EDT

Passing Climate Policy and Adopting Large-Scale Solutions at the State and Local Levels: Staying Resilient Against the Skeptics and Against all Odds
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Grainger Auditorium in Phelps Science Center

Fighting climate change on a policy level presents its challenges, so how can we retain our confidence, stamina, persistence? How do we stay the course in light of opposition in a healthy, sustainable way? How do we walk the talk as far as minimizing our own carbon imprint?

In this workshop, we will discuss strategies and tactics for passing strong climate policy at the state level and local level in efficient ways, and by addressing skeptics and opposition. We will discuss strategies for education and outreach messaging to help change consumer behaviors, finally we’ll discuss how to walk the talk, so that you can be a champion on policy issues.



Speakers
SJ

Susan Jones '82

President, Community Energy Partners
Having dedicated her career to the environment, Comm-En’s mission of bringing renewable energy systems to the Northeast is more than Sue’s profession, it’s her passion. “After working in the renewable energy field for years, founding Comm-En was what I wanted to do,” says... Read More →


Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Grainger Auditorium

10:30am EDT

Playing with Climate Change: Using Games, Poetry, and Art to Imagine a Better World
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Sinha Room, Phelps Science Center

We are good at imagining the end of the world, but less practiced at imagining a better world. In this interactive workshop, we will adopt a playful approach to thinking about climate change and by so doing, practice imagining futures of mutual flourishing for all communities and creatures. Using games, poetry, art, and other creative practices, we'll try to unlock our imaginations and envision what's possible! How can the creative spirit help us address climate change?

Speakers
SS

Stephen Siperstein

Stephen Siperstein lives at the Kohler Environmental Center at Choate Rosemary Hall where he teaches courses in the environmental humanities. He is the editor of the 2016 volume Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities, and his climate change-related poetry has appeared in publications... Read More →


Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Sinha Room, Phelps Science Center

10:30am EDT

RedBikes Rollout!
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Meet by the Track

Want to be the first person to join our FREE campus bike share? If so, then sign up for the RedBikes Rollout Climate Action Day workshop! Run by the Green Umbrella Learning Lab and StuCo’s Student Life Committee, this workshop will allow you to be among the very first participants in the RedBikes program. We will use the time to give you the history of the creation of the Redbikes program and how it furthers the Academy’s sustainability efforts. We’ll orient you to the details of how the program works--from how to use the bikes and the Bloom app, to the rules and regulations that will govern the program. You will enjoy lots of riding and stories of how the bike share came to be. After the workshop, you will be able to use the bikes on a daily basis and you will play a role in helping us to refine the RedBikes Orientation for other students. Go Redbikes!

Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Meet by the Track

10:30am EDT

Science Journalism in the Age of Climate Change
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Latin Study, 2nd Floor Academy Building

Climate change is arguably the most important scientific story of our time. Yet the topic is also among the most controversial in science journalism. Misinformation continues to run rampant. So how can we best educate the public and inspire productive conversations concerning the crisis? In this workshop, science journalist Lynne Peeples will share her experiences in covering climate-related topics as a staff reporter for The Huffington Post and as a freelancer for news outlets including NBC News and Scientific American. Students will then have the opportunity to start formulating accurate and convincing stories of their own on timely issues such as green energy, carbon sequestration and the impacts of a changing climate on public health. Interested students may even expand on their workshop writings for potential future publication in MATTER Magazine.



Speakers
avatar for Lynne Peeples

Lynne Peeples

Lynne Peeples is a Seattle-based freelance science journalist, specializing in the environment, public health and medicine.Her writing has appeared in Nature, Scientific American, The Huffington Post, NBC News, Popular Science, Undark Magazine, The Atlantic and Pharmacy Practice News... Read More →


Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Latin Study, 2nd Floor Academy Building

10:30am EDT

The Sun: 4.5 Billion Years to Run: The Path to an All Electric Future
Limited Capacity full

Location: Seabrooke Room, Elm Street DHall

We’ll trace the history of solar energy over 50 centuries and understand the disruption that photovoltaic (PV) electricity provides. Despite the fact that PV only makes up two percent of energy generation today, it is less expensive than any other form of electricity and the displacement of fossil fuels is inevitable. You will learn about perovskite, a mineral discovered in 1839, which is one of the most exciting materials being explored today, both for light emission as well as for energy generation, which will accelerate the transformation to an all-electric future.
Some of the questions we will address related to this all-electric future: What if electricity were virtually free? What are the technological, political and societal impacts? Is this enough to mitigate climate change? What happens to big oil? Can wind save us? What about nuclear? Isn’t it sustainable? PV: what happens at night and the need for storage. Grid-lock: are micro-grids the solution?

Speakers

Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Seabrooke Room, Elm St. DHall

10:30am EDT

Water Quality at Exeter and Beyond with Mindi Messmer and the GULL Class
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Forum, 3rd Floor, EPAC

Join members of the Green Umbrella Learning Lab (GULL) in a discussion about the quality of Exeter’s municipal water supply and its impact on our community at large. According to town quarterly reports, our local water contains elevated levels of contaminants, including the carcinogen trihalomethanes. GULL students set out to ascertain the repercussions of the substandard water quality within the context of the PEA campus.
In this workshop, we’ll discuss the condition of Exeter’s drinking water and learn about future plans for its improvement. We’ll engage in conversation with Paul Roy, the manager of the Town’s water system, Tegan DeGenova, PEA’s Environmental Compliance Manager, and Mindi Messmer, a former member of the State’s House of Representatives and an expert on local incidents of cancer.

Finally, participants will measure trihalomethane levels of samples from campus water fountains using a spectrometer and reagent kit, in a partnership with the Chemistry Department. We encourage students to bring their own water samples so we can determine the extent to which the level of carcinogens exceeds the federal limit. 

Speakers

Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Forum, 3rd Floor EPAC

10:30am EDT

Winning a Carbon Price with Our Climate
Limited Capacity filling up

Venue:  Modern Language Dept Room, Phillips Hall, 4th Floor

Interested in advocating for strong, science-based climate policy? Join Our Climate’s New England Field Coordinator (and once PEA Biology instructor) Eben Bein and Exonian student leaders who fight to put a price on carbon pollution. During this workshop, we will explore how youth are championing the movement for carbon pricing policy across the country and here in New England. We will review the basics of carbon pricing policy and the #PutAPriceOnIt campaign, then break up into small skill-building teams by interest: Legislative Advocacy, Campaigning at Exeter, and Carbon Pricing Art and Memes. Lastly, each team will share their main takeaways with the larger group and end with a Q & A and opportunities to join the campaign.

Speakers

Friday April 26, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Modern Language Dept. Room, Phillips Hall, 4th Floor

1:30pm EDT

Air pollution: A Grand Challenge for Human Health and Environmental Justice
Limited Capacity full

Venue: Assembly Hall

Air pollution is the single most important environmental health risk factor, killing millions of people every year worldwide. But what are the main pollutants to be concerned about, and how do they hurt us? What are the main sources of pollution, and how can we reduce it? Do people breathe the same air across the world, or even across the United States?

This workshop will be a primer on air pollution: sources, effects and controls, and the grand challenge air pollution poses for all of us in the 21st Century. This is a big, exciting, and important problem, affecting human health and environmental justice. In fact, as our recent work has shown, in the United States a major class of pollutants is disproportionately inhaled by black and Hispanic Americans, even though it is disproportionately caused by the white/other racial-ethnic majority. The solutions to air pollution will depend on involvement from those in the physical, social, environmental and health sciences, not to mention engineers, lawyers, policy makers, businesses, and activists. Expect to leave with some surprising facts from the emerging scientific literature about air pollution; some understanding about what laws are in place for cleaning the air in the United States; and some actionable knowledge about how to find out about air quality in your area.




Speakers

Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Assembly Hall

1:30pm EDT

The Secret Lives of Icelandic Glaciers
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Goel Center for Theater and Dance

Environmental educator and National Geographic expert Dr. M Jackson has spent years researching glaciers and climate change. In The Secret Lives of Icelandic Glaciers, she effectively explains what glaciers are, why they matter to people and landscape, and how understanding the individuality and interconnections of people and ice is critical to engaging with climate change today. She poses a stark question: what actually happens as communities lose their glaciers? By drawing on the glacier-related narratives, knowledges, and practices of people living along the southeastern coast of Iceland, Jackson demonstrates the lived complexities peoples worldwide face living within modern transforming environments. Jackson shares unforgettable stories of Icelandic glaciers that will dramatically change how people worldwide think about ice.


Speakers
avatar for Dr. M.  Jackson

Dr. M. Jackson

Geographer, Glaciolotist, TED Fellow, National Geographic Society Explorer
Dr. M Jackson is a geographer, glaciologist, TED Fellow, and National Geographic Society Explorer. M earned a doctorate from the University of Oregon where she examined how climate change transformed people and glacier communities in Iceland. M is the recipient of many grants and... Read More →


Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Goel Center for Theater and Dance

1:30pm EDT

Beyond Straws: How Do We Move our Communities and Culture Away from Single-Use Plastic?
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Elting Room

Where is all the plastic coming from? What are the challenges in reducing it? How can we make exponential change? Take your next step for the environment--there’s never been a better time! Not only are we in a time of extraordinary need for environmental action, but the options and support for each of us to contribute have never been more abundant and accessible. Join Keith Tharp of Sustainable Seacoast to engage these exciting conversation!

Speakers
KT

Keith Tharp

Sustainable Seacoast


Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Elting Room

1:30pm EDT

Campus Heating Plant Tour
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Patio steps of Goel Center for Theater and Dance

Did you ever wonder…
Is the Academy doing its part to cut its emissions of greenhouse gasses?

How could you make ice in the rinks with superheated steam?

And what’s under that smokestack behind the gymnasium?

Tour the Academy’s heating plant with manager Mr. Joe Klempa and learn about how the Academy boils and recycles thousands of gallons of water every day to heat and cool the spaces we live and work in, and how we use updated technologies to get these jobs done with environmental stewardship in mind.  Each participant will receive a “treasure hunt” puzzle to discover key facts and surprising stories of PEA’s energy use and production.


Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Patio steps of Goel Center for Theater and Dance

1:30pm EDT

Campus Waste Audit
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Entrance to Facilities Management, directly across from the New Parking Garage entrance. NOTE: This is a change in venue. Please dress accordingly.

Do you know how much waste PEA generates in a day? What is the largest component of this waste? What is put in the trash that can be reused or recycled? To find answers to these questions and more join the Climate Action Day Waste Audit Team! Using gloves and other protective gear, dive in and separate waste from various Academy buildings. Estimate the volume and/or percentage each type contributes to the daily total. How can we reduce this amount? The information you compile will be made available to the PEA Community along with any ideas on how to reduce our waste as individuals and as a school.


1:30pm EDT

Climate Change and Invasive Species at Great Bay Discovery Center
Limited Capacity full

Location:  Meet in the EPAC Commons
Vehicle: Dragon

Climate change can have negative impacts on native plant species directly, and also indirectly by helping to increase the growth of invasive species. Learn how climate change supports the growth of invasive and help to remove invasive species at the Great Bay Discovery Center Greenland, NH. The Great Bay Discovery Center is an educational center at the Great Bay Estuarine Research Reserve. The Great Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (GBNERR) is part of a national network of protected areas and promotes long-term research, education and stewardship throughout the Great Bay estuary. Created under the Coastal Zone Management Act, the National Estuarine Research Reserve partnership program between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the coastal states protects more than one million acres of the nation's most important coastal resources.

Wear clothing you don't mind getting dirty. Long pants, long shirts, sturdy shoes, cold weather or rain gear. Bring a filled water bottle.

Speakers
MB

Melissa Brogle

Great Bay Discovery Center


Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
EPAC Commons for Transportation

1:30pm EDT

Creating Long-Term Value and Outperformance through Impact Investing, with PEA Alumnus Peter Grubstein
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Library Commons

Does achieving a double bottom line have to be concessionary? Which is, can you get a social return on your investment as well as a financial return? In this presentation you will learn about different ways to make an impact while generating an at-or-above market return. We expect that you will gain insight on the return profiles for various investment objectives along the impact investing spectrum, and learn about the strategies used to achieve those objectives. We will show you how the industry has evolved overtime, including common misnomers and misperceptions surrounding the space, as well as best practices, mistakes to avoid when investing in impact funds, and what the future looks like for impact.


Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Library Commons

1:30pm EDT

Eating for the Climate: Experimenting with plant-Forward Diets
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Phillips Church Basement

If you are interested in reducing your climate footprint, but you aren’t sure how, this workshop is for you! Eating fewer animal products is a substantive and immediate action you can take for the health of the planet, but many people worry about their protein intake and their food option, when making a transition to eating less meat. The 3 presenters will share their own transitions and explorations with dietary choices, in order to support and encourage yours. Come ready to engage in discussion and to explore options for a healthier lifestyle! Vegan treats will be available to sample.

Speakers
ES

Emmett Shell '18

Emmett Shell ’18 is in his 6th year as a vegan. At Exeter, he balanced a vegan diet with varsity sport participation in basketball and volleyball.
HD

Heidi Dumont

Heidi Dumont is the force behind Wetherell Dining Hall’s fresh, delicious food.  She is not vegetarian or vegan, but she has attended several conferences and trainings to become the ally she currently is for plant-based dietary choices.
AS

Amy Schwartz

History teacher Amy Schwartz has been vegetarian since 2013 and recently transitioned to veganism. A self-professed meat lover, she has many strategies to share on transitioning your diet.


Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Phillips Church Basement

1:30pm EDT

In Business to Save Our Home Planet
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Round Room, 2nd Floor of the Music Building

Stefan Bergill is a sales rep for the outdoor apparel company Patagonia. He will outline Patagonia’s strategies for both helping improve and reducing their impact on the environment. As a company, Patagonia is committed to designing sustainable products, following sustainable practices, and helping others do the same. Learn what strides Patagonia has made and what plans they have for the future. Mr. Bergill will help to explain the effects of the clothing industry on the environment and how one small clothing company can try to mitigate climate change.

Speakers
SB

Stefan Bergill

Patagonia, Inc.


Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Round Room, 2nd Floor of Music Building

1:30pm EDT

It’s Electric! (Your city’s new public bus, that is.)
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Gillepsie room, located in the Institutional Advancement building

From New York to Seattle, some of the country’s most environmentally progressive transit agencies have committed to electrifying their entire public bus fleet over the next couple decades. Why are electric buses an integral part of cities’ climate action plans, and can this new technology live up to its promise? How will transit agencies afford this massive transformation and achieve it without disrupting service? In this workshop, we’ll explore the opportunities and challenges of rolling out electric buses, whether in Exeter, NH or in large cities with millions of residents. Put yourself in the shoes of a transit planner as we figure out how, when, and where to charge these new high-tech and whisper-quiet vehicles. Our goals are to reduce emissions, stay on schedule, minimize costs, and get people home from work and school without running out of juice!

Kate Tomford is a Senior Analyst in the Finance Department at the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA), where she manages energy-related initiatives including energy efficiency, electric buses, and utility cost management. She has 15 years of experience in the field of environmental and energy policy, previously serving in positions with the Illinois Governor’s Office and the Illinois Energy Office, and as a consultant to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Kate graduated from Exeter in 1995, way back before anyone in her dorm (Wheelwright) had a cell phone or an internet connection! She holds an MS in Environmental Science and Policy from the University of Chicago Harris School and an AB in Earth and Planetary Sciences from Harvard College.

Speakers
KT

Kate Tomford '95

Senior Analyst, Chicago Transit Authority
Kate Tomford is a Senior Analyst in the Finance Department at the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA), where she manages energy-related initiatives including energy efficiency, electric buses, and utility cost management.  She has 15 years of experience in the field of environmental... Read More →


Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Gillepsie room, located in the Institutional Advancement building

1:30pm EDT

Ocean Plastics and Hampton Beach Clean Up
Limited Capacity full

Location:  Meet in the Parking Lot behind St. Anthony's Bakery
Vehicle: Yellow School Bus

The Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation, a non-profit based in Portsmouth, NH, will be leading students in a hands-on beach cleanup at Hampton Beach. After a presentation and discussion about ocean plastics, we will be removing marine debris such as bottles, ropes, bags, and cigarette butts, while collecting data on the types and amounts of debris found as part of Blue Ocean Society’s research program. Students will work in groups to clean from the water’s edge up to the sidewalk near the beach’s landmark outdoor stage, collecting any and all trash they can find, from the tiniest fragments to the largest objects.

Dress for the weather. It will be colder at the beach.
Gloves and collection bags provided. 

Speakers
KP

Katie Pelon

Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation


Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Parking Lot behind St. Anthony's Bakery for Transportation

1:30pm EDT

Passing Climate Policy and Adopting Large-Scale Solutions at the State and Local Levels: Staying Resilient Against the Skeptics and Against all Odds
Limited Capacity full

Venue: Grainger Auditorium

Fighting climate change on a policy level presents its challenges, so how can we retain our confidence, stamina, persistence? How do we stay the course in light of opposition in a healthy, sustainable way? How do we walk the talk as far as minimizing our own carbon imprint?

In this workshop, we will discuss strategies and tactics for passing strong climate policy at the state level and local level in efficient ways, and by addressing skeptics and opposition. We will discuss strategies for education and outreach messaging to help change consumer behaviors, finally we’ll discuss how to walk the talk, so that you can be a champion on policy issues.


Speakers
SJ

Susan Jones '82

President, Community Energy Partners
Having dedicated her career to the environment, Comm-En’s mission of bringing renewable energy systems to the Northeast is more than Sue’s profession, it’s her passion. “After working in the renewable energy field for years, founding Comm-En was what I wanted to do,” says... Read More →


Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Grainger Auditorium

1:30pm EDT

Playing with Climate Change: Using Games, Poetry, and Art to Imagine a Better World
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Sinha Room, Phelps Science Center

We are good at imagining the end of the world, but less practiced at imagining a better world. In this interactive workshop, we will adopt a playful approach to thinking about climate change and by so doing, practice imagining futures of mutual flourishing for all communities and creatures. Using games, poetry, art, and other creative practices, we'll try to unlock our imaginations and envision what's possible! How can the creative spirit help us address climate change?

Speakers
SS

Stephen Siperstein

Stephen Siperstein lives at the Kohler Environmental Center at Choate Rosemary Hall where he teaches courses in the environmental humanities. He is the editor of the 2016 volume Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities, and his climate change-related poetry has appeared in publications... Read More →


Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Sinha Room, Phelps Science Center

1:30pm EDT

RedBikes Rollout!
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Meet by the Track

Want to be the first person to join our FREE campus bike share? If so, then sign up for the RedBikes Rollout Climate Action Day workshop! Run by the Green Umbrella Learning Lab and StuCo’s Student Life Committee, this workshop will allow you to be among the very first participants in the RedBikes program. We will use the time to give you the history of the creation of the Redbikes program and how it furthers the Academy’s sustainability efforts. We’ll orient you to the details of how the program works--from how to use the bikes and the Bloom app, to the rules and regulations that will govern the program. You will enjoy lots of riding and stories of how the bike share came to be. After the workshop, you will be able to use the bikes on a daily basis and you will play a role in helping us to refine the RedBikes Orientation for other students. Go Redbikes!

Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Meet by the Track

1:30pm EDT

Science Journalism in the Age of Climate Change
Limited Capacity filling up

Venue:  Latin Study, 2nd Floor Academy Building

Climate change is arguably the most important scientific story of our time. Yet the topic is also among the most controversial in science journalism. Misinformation continues to run rampant. So how can we best educate the public and inspire productive conversations concerning the crisis? In this workshop, science journalist Lynne Peeples will share her experiences in covering climate-related topics as a staff reporter for The Huffington Post and as a freelancer for news outlets including NBC News and Scientific American. Students will then have the opportunity to start formulating accurate and convincing stories of their own on timely issues such as green energy, carbon sequestration and the impacts of a changing climate on public health. Interested students may even expand on their workshop writings for potential future publication in MATTER Magazine.



Speakers
avatar for Lynne Peeples

Lynne Peeples

Lynne Peeples is a Seattle-based freelance science journalist, specializing in the environment, public health and medicine.Her writing has appeared in Nature, Scientific American, The Huffington Post, NBC News, Popular Science, Undark Magazine, The Atlantic and Pharmacy Practice News... Read More →


Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Latin Study, 2nd Floor Academy Building

1:30pm EDT

The Sun: 4.5 Billion Years to Run: The Path to an All Electric Future
Limited Capacity full

Location: Seabrooke Room, Elm Street DHall

We’ll trace the history of solar energy over 50 centuries and understand the disruption that photovoltaic (PV) electricity provides. Despite the fact that PV only makes up two percent of energy generation today, it is less expensive than any other form of electricity and the displacement of fossil fuels is inevitable. You will learn about perovskite, a mineral discovered in 1839, which is one of the most exciting materials being explored today, both for light emission as well as for energy generation, which will accelerate the transformation to an all-electric future.
Some of the questions we will address related to this all-electric future: What if electricity were virtually free? What are the technological, political and societal impacts? Is this enough to mitigate climate change? What happens to big oil? Can wind save us? What about nuclear? Isn’t it sustainable? PV: what happens at night and the need for storage. Grid-lock: are micro-grids the solution?

Speakers

Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Seabrooke Room, Elm St. DHall

1:30pm EDT

Water Quality at Exeter and Beyond with Mindi Messmer and the GULL Class
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Forum, 3rd Floor, EPAC

Join members of the Green Umbrella Learning Lab (GULL) in a discussion about the quality of Exeter’s municipal water supply and its impact on our community at large. According to town quarterly reports, our local water contains elevated levels of contaminants, including the carcinogen trihalomethanes. GULL students set out to ascertain the repercussions of the substandard water quality within the context of the PEA campus.
In this workshop, we’ll discuss the condition of Exeter’s drinking water and learn about future plans for its improvement. We’ll engage in conversation with Paul Roy, the manager of the Town’s water system, Tegan DeGenova, PEA’s Environmental Compliance Manager, and Mindi Messmer, a former member of the State’s House of Representatives and an expert on local incidents of cancer.

Finally, participants will measure trihalomethane levels of samples from campus water fountains using a spectrometer and reagent kit, in a partnership with the Chemistry Department. We encourage students to bring their own water samples so we can determine the extent to which the level of carcinogens exceeds the federal limit. 

Speakers

Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Forum, 3rd Floor EPAC

1:30pm EDT

Winning a Carbon Price with Our Climate
Limited Capacity full

Venue:  Modern Language Dept Room, Phillips Hall, 4th Floor

Interested in advocating for strong, science-based climate policy? Join Our Climate’s New England Field Coordinator (and once PEA Biology instructor) Eben Bein and Exonian student leaders who fight to put a price on carbon pollution. During this workshop, we will explore how youth are championing the movement for carbon pricing policy across the country and here in New England. We will review the basics of carbon pricing policy and the #PutAPriceOnIt campaign, then break up into small skill-building teams by interest: Legislative Advocacy, Campaigning at Exeter, and Carbon Pricing Art and Memes. Lastly, each team will share their main takeaways with the larger group and end with a Q & A and opportunities to join the campaign.

Speakers

Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Modern Language Dept. Room, Phillips Hall, 4th Floor

1:30pm EDT

[E]MISSION[S]: CRITICAL
Limited Capacity filling up

Venue:  Lamont Gallery

This workshop will feature the four contemporary artists whose work is included in the current environmentally-themed exhibition at the Lamont Gallery: Evan Anderman (’83), Lucinda Bliss, Tom Hall, and Jim Sardonis (’69). The afternoon session will begin in the galleries themselves for the first hour, and conclude with a panel discussion in Mayer Auditorium. Attendance will be limited to 40 attendees.

With the mounting research on greenhouse gas emissions, carbon emissions, deforestation emissions and so on, the Paris Agreement goal since 2015 has been to hold global warming below 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit (2 degrees Celsius) over pre-industrial levels. It’s not working out so well. The self-assigned mission of these artists has been to examine through an aesthetic lens the environmental decline that they each observe, and bear witness through the visual arts.

Through photography, painting, drawing, sculpture and mixed media, these artists call our attention to different aspects of our climatic plight. From an aerial perspective, from hiking through the woods, and from the water as well, human and other species’ viewpoints address topics of water loss, water-quality deterioration, agri-business, forest clearcutting, habitat loss, and other ills with which we as a society – a global society – continue to grapple. Discussion will be about experiences in the environment that resonate, and also opportunities and personal responsibilities to make a difference.

Speakers
EA

Evan Anderman '83

Evan Anderman is a social-landscape photographer based in his hometown of Denver, Colorado who seeks to challenge our understanding of the relationship between human development and the natural world.  His aerial photography endeavors to bring into focus the difficult to see widespread... Read More →


Friday April 26, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Lamont Gallery